A closed mouth
gathers no
foot

Features

High Noon for Higher Education

Illinois Alumni magazine May 2006

In 1636, a mere 16 years after landing on North America’s shores, the Pilgrims put themselves to another task — establishing Harvard University.

More than 100 years later, founding father Thomas Jefferson declared, “If we’re going to have a successful democratic society, we have to have a well-educated and healthy citizenry.”

Fender Bender

Illinois Alumni magazine November 2005

When David Spelman returned to his Urbana hotel after midnight, he found world-class musicians Mamadou Diabate and Juan Martín jamming in an alcove of the Historic Lincoln Hotel’s lobby. Another guitarist, Dan Zanes, was on the floor with a quiet smile on his face. Others sat on chairs or by the fireplace.

All were rapt.

Medical Students Value Diverse Environment

Science & Spirit magazine September 2003

While diversity issues, from affirmative action to bilingual education, have garnered plenty of attention over the past several months, they have recently registered on the monitors in a different arena: medical school.

A survey conducted at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, the first such study to examine the attitudes of medical students themselves, overwhelmingly indicated diversity was a critical factor in their education.

The Nurture of Nature

Science & Spirit magazine July 2003

What if there existed a simple object found in everyday life that could relieve stress and anxiety, promote healing and increase powers of concentration? It appears likely that such “magic bullets” do exist, and that they come in the forms of trees or shrubs or even philodendrons. Just as plants lift their leaves to the sky, they likewise lift our spirits — helping us de-stress, recover faster, concentrate better and control impulsive behavior.

Focus on Conservation

Lincoln Park Zoo magazine March 2003

From elephants to spiders, many of the animals chosen for the Regenstein African Journey exhibits are threatened or endangered.

Against All Odds

Illinois Alumni magazine June 2002

The 1950s were somewhat of a quiet time in the United States. On the University of Illinois campus at Urbana, majestic elm trees graced the Quad; women wore sweater sets, pearls and bobby socks; men were mostly clean-shaven; and shirts were button-down. The idea of walking on the Quad grass, wearing one’s hair long or dressing casually was unthinkable.

A World In Motion

Washington University School of Law Magazine January 2001

Immigration law has historically swung like a pendulum, pushed in part by public fears and hopes. When the economy is strong, immigration law is generous, when conditions are more stressful, restrictions on immigration grow. But even in the aftermath of the September 11 disaster, Stephen Legomsky, Charles F. Nagel Professor of International and Comparative Law, and Director of the Institute for Global Legal Studies, remains firmly upbeat about the benefits of immigration. September 11 has, however, influenced his thinking on the need to take precautions.

Pages

Read more writings in my features, essays or books